About Ouabache

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About Ouabache


The word Ouabache is Indian and French in origin. The Miami Indian pronunciation of the "Wabash" River was "Wah-bah-shi-ki." It meant pure white, bright, or natural and referred to a limestone bed in the upper part of the river. French Jesuits later shortened the name to "Ouabache." Early 1700 maps of the Northwest Territory have Wabash River spelled "Ouabache River."

Ouabache may be pronouced:      
      
Wa' - bash (French)
       Wah - ba' - she (Indian)
      
Wah - ba' - che (Indian)

Ouabache School is a consolidation of the former Rea and Collett Schools. The architect for the modern building was Everett I. Brown Company. Located on 9.5 acres, the building contains 58,796 square feet and has a capacity for 500 students. The new building, including site, fees, furniture, and equipment, was financed through a cumulative building fund at a cost of $3,380,734.33.

Ground Breaking Ceremony.....................................May 25, 1977
School Name Officially Adopted ..............................November 30, 1977
Cornerstone Laid .........................................................October 16, 1978
Ouabache School Opened.........................................March 19, 1979

On November 21, 1983, bids were awarded by the Vigo County School Corporation Board of School Trustees for a small building addion and relocation of the Fan Room. Completion  was scheduled for  August 15, 1984.



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